Rollin' and Tumblin' // Kenyon Adams and Jonny Rodgers
Rollin' and Tumblin' // Kenyon Adams and Jonny Rodgers
I Will // Andy Gullahorn
I Will // Andy Gullahorn
Silence // Jars of Clay
Silence // Jars of Clay
In the Night // Andrew Peterson, Buddy Greene, Jeff Taylor, Andy Gullahorn
In the Night // Andrew Peterson, Buddy Greene, Jeff Taylor, Andy Gullahorn
Rollin' and Tumblin' // Kenyon Adams and Jonny RodgersRockfall is the geologic term for the falling, rolling, bounding, or tumbling of a newly detached mass of rock from a cliff. That a rockfall had recently occurred was apparent as soon as we entered the Box Canyon. Several fresh boulders gleamed conspicuously from the dark canyon floor. Elsewhere, piles of white rubble marked where other falling rocks had shattered on impact. We all looked up in an effort to identify the source. And also to be sure nothing else might be headed down soon. So it seemed altogether appropriate that Kenyon and Jonny had planned to try the blues standard, “Rollin’ and Tumblin’.” They took up seats on a couple of these new rocks and, after a quick refresher of the progression, initiated the Box Canyon blues.
I Will // Andy GullahornIn May 2013, Roger Feldman completed construction of his site-specific art space, Threshold. One year later, the work is beginning to find its place in the landscape of Laity Lodge. There have been late night visits to the site, numerous dawn patrols, and even the occasional guest who goes missing from the morning sessions only to reappear at lunch with accounts of hours spent alone inside the stone chambers. Roger once remarked that Threshold offered the possibility for “an expansive experience.” If that’s true, then perhaps the most expansive experience starts small: a simple song, a few friends, and some space to play.
Silence // Jars of ClayThe last song of the night with Jars of Clay was "Silence." Dan invited the audience to sing along and the band walked us through a brief tutorial showing us just where and how to join in. We did eventually (and somewhat quietly) find our collective voice near the end of the performance. But for the most part we stood in silence and listened.We’ve all got questions, so it seemed fitting to be concluding the evening (and the series) with this song—a sort of anthem to those questions that keep getting asked and the all-too-often silent response. And it seems equally fitting to close this description with a quote from David Dark, a regular contributor at the Lodge and a mutual friend of Jars of Clay and ours (his name comes up whenever we’re together):“I believe deliverance begins with questions. It begins with people who 'love' questions, people who 'live with' questions and 'by' questions, people who feel a deep joy when good questions are asked. When we meet these people–some living, some through history and art—things begin to change. Something is let loose. When we’re exposed to the liveliness of holding everything up to the light of good questions—what I call 'sacred questioning'—we discover that redemption is creeping into the way we think, believe, and see the world. This 're'-deeming (re-valuing) of what we’ve made of our lives, a redemption that perhaps begins with the insertion of a question mark beside whatever feels final and absolute and beyond question, gives our souls a bit of elbow room, a space in which to breathe and imagine again, as if for the first time.”—The Sacredness of Questioning Everything
In the Night // Andrew Peterson, Buddy Greene, Jeff Taylor, Andy GullahornThrough a variety of fortunate circumstances, Buddy Greene, Jeff Taylor, Andy Gullahorn, and Andrew Peterson were all planning to be at the same winter retreat. These are not members of the same band; they've never recorded an album together. But they are friends.Days before the retreat, we contacted them all: “Lately we’ve been kicking around the idea of trying to make some simple videos of musicians at the Lodge … we would like to attempt something next weekend if we can find the time … it might be a lot of fun to get you all playing together.”So there we were, just after lunch on Friday afternoon, shivering together in the Box Canyon with only a sketch of a plan of what to do next.Bringing friends together, being receptive to a place, learning something new, and maybe just winging it – these are some consistent ingredients in our retreat planning process. And when these things come together, like they did when Andrew started singing In the Night, it’s a privilege to watch what takes shape. It’s also fun to film it. Enjoy.
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